Book Review: The Weight of Blood



You know how a good book sticks with you? I couldn't get this one out of my mind.  


From Goodreads: The Dane family's roots tangle deep in the Ozark Mountain town of Henbane, but that doesn't keep sixteen-year-old Lucy Dane from being treated like an outsider. Folks still whisper about her mother, a bewitching young stranger who inspired local myths when she vanished years ago. When one of Lucy's few friends, slow-minded Cheri, is found murdered, Lucy feels haunted by the two lost girls-the mother she never knew and the friend she couldn't protect. Everything changes when Lucy stumbles across Cheri's necklace in an abandoned trailer and finds herself drawn into a search for answers.

Lucy and Lila are two female characters who are linked in a mother-daughter relationship that always hits an emotional note with readers (or at least it always does with me). What's great about this book is  that the author does an amazing job making Lucy and Lila's relationship powerful enough without ever having to the two really meet. Lucy doesn't remember her mother, who disappeared when she was just a baby. But with amazing storytelling and switching characters in such a talented story telling style that doesn't confuse the reader, McHugh connects the mother and daughter over generations.  

What is happening in Lucy's small town and even smaller world around her was actually way more guttural than I thought it would be. I really didn't see the twists coming. Honestly, I would have enjoyed the book without the deep secrets that explained Lila's disappearance and the murder of Lucy's childhood friend. That's how great the writing was. I didn't even need a plot. I just wanted to read more about the town, the neighbors, the interesting characters...I loved how the stories intertwined with each other. One character's chapter would leave some questions unanswered but in the next chapter, another character would unknowingly give me the answers I needed. 

You will read about Lucy's curiosity, and about how her beautiful mother ended up in the small town and how her best friend was murdered(and more importantly, why). You'll be jealous of her friendships but be just as relieved you don't have some of her questionable relatives. There are so many holes in Lucy's past that you'll want to find answers just as much as she does. 

Read this book if you love great character development, if you appreciate small town complexities, mysterious paths and family connections. Don't be afraid to read this book if you like a little danger and mystery but be weary if you have a weak stomach because even though the good people in this book are good people, the bad ones are really bad.  

Happy reading! 

Uganda Read Chelsea Handler's Book: A Review

Oh what, you're surprised I finally have a book review on my book blog? 

I'm motivated to review this mostly because I'm going to see her on May 2 so I thought I'd better brush up on what stories she'll be telling. I've read all of Chelsea Handler's books and look forward to watching Chuy's her show whenever I can stay up that late. 

I give Uganda Be Kidding Me 5 stars. 5 stars as in, "Uganda read this book."

Why? Because she's frickin' hilarious and random and witty. 
And there's just something sadistically funny about someone tearing their ACL on a Swiss ski mountain. 


From Goodreads: Wherever Chelsea Handler travels, one thing is certain: she always ends up in the land of the ridiculous. Now, in this uproarious collection, she sneaks her sharp wit through airport security and delivers her most absurd and hilarious stories ever.

If you need a good laugh, or inspiration that will get you outta town and on an air plane, Uganda read this book. 

Her safari trip to South Africa takes the cake for the funniest trip but her ski vacation had me laughing out loud too. 

The icing on the cake was that I was reading about Chelsea Handler drinking and taking Xanax on an airplane while I myself was drinking and taking Xanax on an airplane so I pretty much felt like Chelsea herself. And what more could you ask for, really? 

The best thing I took away from reading Uganda Be Kidding Me was that A) I need to go on a Safari like, yesterday. B) Australian accents will always be hot and C) Money can't buy happiness, but it can certainly buy you trips around the world with your favorite people and that sounds pretty damn happy to me. 

At the end of the book, Chelsea shares travel tips and ends with: "Go for it. Go where ever you can afford to go with whomever you can get to go with you." 

She also shared a beautiful photo of herself as a little girl, along with an anecdote about her mother that showed a softer, sentimental side of her that I always knew was there underneath the hilarious self deprecation and drunken shenanigans. She's one of those characters that has so much to give because she's not just one-dimensional. I doubt she'll run out of material anytime soon. 

I also was inspired to drink more Bloody Marys, Mimosas and Margaritas after reading this book, which I honestly didn't think was possible, since I pretty much think about drinking them all day. So thanks for that, Chels.